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Tag: 12 Keys to Fat Loss

Gil Hedley, Ph.D., of http://www.gilhedley.com gives a lesson on the importance of movement and stretching to maintain the sliding properties of tissues in the body, as well as the value of bodywork modalities.

If this video doesn’t inspire you to stretch and move more, then I don’t know what will… Enjoy!

Happy training!  And don’t forget to download your free copy of “The 12 Keys to Fat Loss”

Andrew Burchell, Dipl.Ex.Sci

Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist

andrew.burchell@stayfitanywhere.com

Follow us on Twitter

Purpose:
The Medicine Ball Standup Press is a modified squat to press exercise that develops strength & power in the lower and upper body. This exercise can be great for those that are overweight and/or with poor flexibility of the lower body.

Action:
Begin by sitting on a workout bench with perfect posture and holding the medicine ball at chest height. Perform the action by driving through your heels, bringing your hips forward, and pressing the medicine ball over your head.

Sets/Reps:
Begin by performing one set of 10 reps in a controlled manor.  As you build your strength and endurance in this movement, you can work up to two sets of 20 reps.

Points of Concern:
A common mistake seen in this exercise is too much forward movement and momentum causing overuse of the quadriceps. Make sure you begin with your feet forward so that your knees are at 90 degrees. To get the posterior chain activated press through your heels (rather than your toes), drive the hips forward, and finish in a totally centered position.

Happy training!  And don’t forget to download your free copy of “The 12 Keys to Fat Loss”

Andrew Burchell, Dipl.Ex.Sci

Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist

andrew.burchell@stayfitanywhere.com

Follow us on Twitter

Purpose:

The Shoulder Saw is a great corrective exercise for offsetting the poor posture in the upper body developed from continuous desk work.

On Monday, July 11th, ‘Flexibility for Runners’ was presented at the StayFitAnywhere body education & training stuido (1732 Alberni street) for the Denman Running Room’s ‘Learn to Run’ clinic.  During this info session, presented by StayFitAnywhere’s Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist, Andrew Burchell, the reasons and guidelines for stretching were discussed, followed by demos of great pre-run & post-run stretches.  Here is a quick review of what was covered during the info session:

WHY STRETCH?

  • Muscle is living tissue that, when not used, becomes short and stiff, and progressively declines in function.

ACSM’S POSITION ON THE BENEFITS OF GOOD FLEXIBILITY:

  • Decreases muscle tension
  • Increases muscle relaxation
  • Improves coordination through greater ease of movement
  • Increases range of motion
  • Injury prevention
  • Improvement + Development of body awareness
  • Increases circulation + air exchange
  • Decreases muscle viscosity causing contractions to be easier & smoother
  • Decreases soreness associated with other exercise (like running)

ACSM GUIDELINES FOR FLEXIBILITY TRAINING:

  • Minimal:  2-3 days a week
  • IDEAL:  5-7 days a week
  • Stretch to tightness at the end of the range of motion but not pain
  • Hold each stretch for 15-30 seconds
  • 2-4x/stretch
  • Static stretch all major muscle groups

DYNAMIC STRETCHING (PRE-RUN):

  • Hip Flexor Stretch (split squat position, drive hip forward
  • Hamstrings (staggered stance + bow forwards)
  • Trunk twisting (rotate your torso without moving your hips)
  • Adductors (Wide stance + alternating ‘hip press’)
  • Alternating Calf Stretching vs wall
  • Reverse Shoulder Rolls

STATIC STRETCHING (POST-RUN):

  • Abductors (Figure 4 leg position + ankle movements)
  • Traps (Handcuff stretch/Leg grab)
  • Calfs (use a curb)
  • Hamstrings (shoe on the curb + pull hip back)
  • Quads (lunge position on the curb)

Happy running!  And don’t forget to download your free copy of “The 12 Keys to Fat Loss”

Andrew Burchell, Dipl.Ex.Sci

Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist

andrew.burchell@stayfitanywhere.com

Follow us on Twitter

Purpose:

The Bosu Leg Raise is an exercise for targeting and building strength in the the glutes.

Action:

Begin by lying in a prone (face down) position with your hips on the dome side of the Bosu.  Get your knees off the ground and bent to 90 degree angles with your heels gently touching each other.  Push your heels up in the air toward the ceiling and contract your glutes for 1-3 seconds per rep.  Always exhale as you raise your legs up against gravity.

Sets/Reps:

Begin by performing one set of 8 reps in a slow, controlled fashion.  As you build your strength and endurance in this movement, you can work up to two sets of 15 reps.

Points of Concern:

The biggest challenge and mistake seen in this exercise is over involvement of the lower back.  It is very common to see over-extension of the lumbar spine and over-contraction of the errector spinae muscles.  If this is the case,  then a posterior pelvic tilt must be performed while raising your legs in the air.  This is necessary to stabilize the lumbar spine and achieve maximum recruitment from the glutes.  You must also remember to position your hips on the ‘sweet spot’ of the Bosu in order to get the best possible position for comfort and optimal technique.

Happy training!  And don’t forget to download your free copy of “The 12 Keys to Fat Loss”

Andrew Burchell, Dipl.Ex.Sci

Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist

andrew.burchell@stayfitanywhere.com

Follow us on Twitter

Purpose:

The Supine Leg Drop is a higher level core exercise for increasing strength in the musculature of the core and developing greater stability through the spine and pelvis.

Action:

Lying in a supine position (on your back) with your legs off the ground and bent to 90 degrees, lower one leg towards the ground in a controlled fashion.  Maintain a neutral pelvis and lower your leg as far as you can without breaking your pelvic position (you may find that performing a slight posterior pelvic tilt as you lower your leg helpful).  Remember to exhale as you lower your leg.  Return your leg back up to the start position and repeat the movement on the other leg.

Sets/Reps:

Begin by performing 5 reps per leg (alternating)  in a slow, controlled fashion.  As you build your strength and endurance in this movement, you can drop your leg lower and work up to 10 reps per leg.

Points of Concern:

The challenge of this exercise is to maintain stability through the spine and pelvis.  If you find that you cannot maintain stability (i.e. you arch your lower back), then this exercise may be to intense for you.  When performed properly, your belly button, should ‘hollow out’ (ie. draw in).  If your belly button is ‘bulging out’ or you begin to arch your lower back, then this exercise must be regressed to an easier level through 1 of 2 ways:

  1. Not lowering you leg so far towards the ground.
  2. Keeping one leg completely on the ground and then performing the leg drop.

Happy training!  And don’t forget to download your free copy of “The 12 Keys to Fat Loss”

Andrew Burchell, Dipl.Ex.Sci

Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist

andrew.burchell@stayfitanywhere.com

Follow us on Twitter

Purpose:

The Step-Up Press is a full-body, multi-joint exercise for developing coordination and strength in the lower body (glutes, hamstrings, quads) as well as the upper body (shoulders & triceps).  This exercise can also be used as an aerobic exercise during training sessions or in fitness classes to elevate heart rate and boost metabolic rate.

Action:

Keeping a perfect posture, place your right foot on a sturdy step with dumbbells in shoulder press position (elbows at 90 degrees). In a simultaneous fashion, push through your right foot to raise your body while raising your arms in the shoulder press movement.

Sets/Reps:

Begin by performing 10 reps per leg with little to no weights.  As you build endurance and master the technique of this movement, work up to 2-3 sets of 10 reps per side with 5-10 lbs dumbbells.

Points of Concern:

The biggest mistake made during this exercise is not matching the movement and speed of the knee lift to the movement and speed of the shoulder press movement.  The two movements must match each other perfectly!  Also make sure you can adequately perform a Shoulder Press and a basic Step Up in isolation before you attempt this exercise.

Happy training!  And don’t forget to download your free copy of “The 12 Keys to Fat Loss”

Andrew Burchell, Dipl.Ex.Sci

Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist

andrew.burchell@stayfitanywhere.com

Follow us on Twitter

On Wednesday, June 8th 2011, ‘Exercise Strategies for Saving your Spine’ was presented at the UBC Hospital for staff of the Operating Room and Post Anesthetic Care Units.  During this 1 hour practical seminar (presented by StayFitAnywhere’s Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist, Andrew Burchell), causes of  back injury and some ideas on the root causes of back pain were discussed in the first section of the workshop.  During the second section of the workshop, practical ‘spine saving’ exercises were demonstrated by Andrew and practiced by the participants.  Here is a quick review of what was covered during the info session:

Low Back Injuries:

• 80% of people will experience low back pain sometime in their lives

• The most common cause of low-back pain is muscle strain

• Spine disorders are the most prevalent cause of chronic disability in persons less than 45 years old.

• Second only to childbirth in accounting for hospital stays for patients under 65 years old.

• Annual prevalence of low-back disorders in US is 15% at any given time

• In 1992, costs associated with low back estimate from $20 to $50 Billion

• Association between strenuous work/lifting and the severity of spine disorders

• Example:  workers performing heavy lifts from twisted position have 6 times the risk of acute lumbar disc problems compared to workers that perform lighter work

StayFitAnywhere’s thoughts on the root causes of low back pain:

• We are primates designed to protect ourselves to survive

• We are becoming more and more sedentary, causing diminished physical capabilities

• Lack of use, training, and education of our own bodies will inevitably lead to some form of physical condition or dysfunction

• Poor posture, body mechanics, and movement skills can increase the risk for injury

• Every body is different, and therefore, has different musculoskeletal imbalances

• A strong, well-balanced body is more resistant to injury (eg. balance of strength & flexibility in your muscles)

• There are 12 components to physical fitness… how many of them do you train?

• The body is inter-connected!  You are only as strong as your weakest link.  Generally, strong & coordinated muscles in all areas, not just the core, will help lessen the risk for back injury

Foundational ‘Spine Saving’ Exercises:

Posture:

• Setting your ‘Perfect Posture’

Bracing:

• Contracting all areas of the abdominal wall to create a rigidity that is stronger than the sum of its parts.  If you are lifting a maximum load, it is critical that you have a lot of rigidity!

Proprioceptive ‘Wake-Ups’:

• Getting the muscle-system fired up before you perform a heavy lift

Anterior Exercises:

• Isometric crunch + Deep Breathing (keep one leg straight and the other leg bent.  Slide your hands under your lumbar spine to preserve natural ‘S’ curve of the spine)

Posterior Exercises:

• Hip Hinging (hinge point= greater trochanter of the femur.  Remember to ‘spread the floor’ as you lift)

• 4-Point Superman (perfect posture, deep breathing + pull your ground hand towards your ground knee for further core activation)

Side Exercises:

• Side Bridging (perfect posture + slow deep breathing)

Caveats for Exercise as suggested by Dr.  Stuart M. McGill, Professor (Spine Mechanics), University of Waterloo:

  1. Low back exercises have the most beneficial effect when performed daily
  2. The ‘no pain-no gain’ axiom does not apply when exercising the low back (in pained individuals particularly)
  3. General exercise programs that also combine cardiovascualar components (like walking) have been shown to be more effective in both rehabilitation and for injury prevention.
  4. It would be very unwise to perform full range spine motion while under load, shortly after rising from bed.
  5. Given that endurance has more protective value than strength, strength gains should not be overemphasized at the expense of endurance.
  6. Your training objectives must be identified, be they rehabilitation, reduce injury risk, optimize general health, or maximize athletic performance), and the most appropriate exercises chosen.
  7. Be patient and stick with the program.  Increased function and reduction of pain may not occur for 3 months.

Happy training!  And don’t forget to download your free copy of

“The 12 Keys to Fat Loss”

Andrew Burchell, Dipl.Ex.Sci

Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist

andrew.burchell@stayfitanywhere.com

Follow us on Twitter

On Tuesday, May 31st, ‘Fit Over 50’ was presented at Kits Community Centre. During this 1.5 hour informative seminar, presented by StayFitAnywhere’s Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist, Andrew Burchell, aging trends, health statistics, and the 12 fitness components were shared and discussed.  Here is a quick review of what was covered during the info session:

The Physiological Effects of the Aging Process:

  • Resting Heart Rate=  Unchanged
  • Maximum Heart Rate=  Lower
  • Resting and Exercise BP=  Higher
  • VO2 Max=  Lower
  • Reaction-Time=  Slower
  • Muscular Strength=  Lower
  • Flexibility=  Lower
  • Bone Mass=  Lower
  • Fat-Free Body Mass (Lean)=  Lower
  • % Body Fat=  Higher
  • Recovery Time=  Longer

The 12 Components of Physical Fitness (First 5= Health-Related Components, 6 Motor-Skill components of fitness, and StayFitAnywhere’s 12th component)

1. Body Composition (Females <32%, Men <22% = Satisfactory for Health)

2. Cardiovascular Endurance (aerobic exercise 6/10 for 20 minutes)

3. Muscular Endurance

4. Muscular Strength (squats)

5. Muscular Flexibility (stretch while in your chair!)

6. Agility (start in ‘athletic ready position’ + move side to side)

7. Balance (tight-rope walking, standing on one leg + arm tracking)

8. Coordination (hand writing in your non-dominant hand)

9. Power (front step + leg push off)

10. Reaction-Time (pen drop & catch)

11. Speed (walk just a little bit faster than you normally do for 15 seconds on your walk)

12. Postural Fitness (sit up straight, chin-tuck, arms above head)

Other Considerations:

  • Breathing- deep breathing
  • Myofascia- exercises for ‘limbering up’
  • Osteoporosis & Bone Health- resistance training & alkaline diets
  • Frailty- resistance training
  • Low Back Pain- 80% of individuals will experience low back pain at some point in their life. Perform ‘alternating side bum lifts’ while in your chair.

Happy training!  And don’t forget to download your free copy of“The 12 Keys to Fat Loss”

Andrew Burchell, Dipl.Ex.Sci

Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist

andrew.burchell@stayfitanywhere.com

Follow us on Twitter

Purpose:

The Ball Hip Drive Press is an advanced, full-body, multi-joint exercise for developing strength in the lower body (glutes, hamstrings, lower back) as well as the upper body (chest, shoulders, triceps).

Action:

In a bridge position on the ball with 2 dumbbells in your hand, lower your bum close to the floor without moving the ball.  Simultaneously drive your hips back up while pressing the dumbbells directly over your chest.  Perform this exercise in a slow and controlled fashion.

Sets/Reps:

Begin by performing this exercise on the ball without the dumbbells and rehearse the movement pattern.  Then begin by performing 1 set of 15 reps with light-moderate weight load.  As you build your stability and endurance in this position, work up to 2-3 sets of 15 reps.

Points of Concern:

The most challenging aspects of this exercise is two fold:  1)  You are performing a more complex movement pattern.  2)  You are performing the exercise in an unstable environment (the ball).  Make sure you can adequately perform a Ball Chest Press and a Ball Hip Drive in isolation before you attempt this exercise.

Happy training!  And don’t forget to download your free copy of “The 12 Keys to Fat Loss”

Andrew Burchell, Dipl.Ex.Sci

Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist

andrew.burchell@stayfitanywhere.com

Follow us on Twitter